Can California’s San Andreas Break at Once? Study Says Maybe

January 28, 2013

A new study suggests certain earthquake fault segments long thought to be stable may rupture and cause a mega-quake.

That’s what happened during the 2011 magnitude-9 quake in Japan that triggered a tsunami and during the 1999 magnitude-7.6 Chi-Chi quake in Taiwan.

In both cases, scientists assumed that “creeping” segments in a fault would serve as a buffer and prevent the entire fault from unzipping.

But a new study published in the journal Nature suggests this may not always be the case.

This may have important implications for California’s San Andreas Fault, which has a creeping section that separates the locked segments in Northern and Southern California.

From This Issue

Insurance Journal West January 28, 2013
January 28, 2013
Insurance Journal West Magazine

Excess, Surplus & Specialty Markets Directory, Volume I

Subscribe Insurance news headlines delivered to your email.
Get a free subscription to our popular email newsletter.

Add a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*

More News
More News Features