House Healthcare Overhaul Unveiled

By | October 30, 2009

  • October 30, 2009 at 12:22 pm
    CalDudeNoMore says:
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    Umm….this one is dead, or should be.

    The House proposal includes a 5.4 percent surtax on individuals making more than $500,000 and couples earning more than $1 million, which would bring in an estimated $460 billion over 10 years to help pay for covering the uninsured

  • October 30, 2009 at 12:24 pm
    Bill says:
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    “The House bill clearly meets two of the fundamental criteria I have set out: it is fully paid for and will reduce the deficit in the long term,” he said in a statement.

    As Joe Wilson said, “YOU LIE!”

    I hope everyone likes paying for your neighbors health insurance through much higher taxes.

    “The problem with socialism is that eventually you run out of other peoples money.” Ronald Reagan

  • October 30, 2009 at 12:32 pm
    Nugget says:
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    I think the “problem with socialism” quote is attributed to Margaret Thatcher, not Ronald Reagan.

    But either way, it’s still true!

    Hopefully both houses of congress will come to their senses that this is not only unconstituional, but most of us don’t want it or any elected officials who support it!

  • October 30, 2009 at 12:55 pm
    JDK says:
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    If you’ve ever wondered how a government run healthcare plan would work….just go to the postoffice and stand in line……

  • October 30, 2009 at 1:13 am
    Allan says:
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    Yeah, I hate standing in line at the Post Office, DMV, grocery store, hardware store, mall department store, or waiting in the emergency room, dentist office etc.

    When you send a package or a letter throug the post office, does it get to the person you intend it to receive it? Mine always do.

    Bad analogy man.

  • October 30, 2009 at 1:18 am
    Allan says:
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    The whole debate over the government run public option will never fly. Too many obstacles in the way. The best we can hope for is heath insurance carrier regulation and opening up competition across state lines.

  • October 30, 2009 at 1:29 am
    Bill says:
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    Maybe thats a good thing. Lets try a little before we jump in over our heads. Maybe this would be enough without bankrupting the entire country. Remember “Change” Can be a good thing or a bad thing. Lets move a little more slowly to see if we like the results first.

  • October 30, 2009 at 1:46 am
    Joe says:
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    You’re both exactly right; let’s start with portability of insurance between states and employers; real tort reform (i.e., more than just caps, but a peer review system that limits the duty docs owe to patients in order to curtail unnecesary testing ordered by docs), and elimination of mandated coverages by the states.

    The latter will be tough, because so many special interests have lobbied various state legislatures to pass laws requiring that health ins policies issued in such states cover psychological counseling, drug rehab, chiropractors, in vitro fertilization, to name a few. The average number of mandated coverages per state is 45, but some states (NY, NJ, IL, to name a few) have many more mandated coverages and guess what else these states have in common? The highest health ins premiums. Duh? Let the consumer decide what the coverages the consumer wants to buy. How many single folks will buy in vitro fertilization? Is it fair to ask others to pay for these elective types of health care?

    Anyway, when I need a dent fixed on my car, I don’t have the car overhauled. Keep it simple, stupid senators and congressmen.

  • October 30, 2009 at 2:13 am
    Mark says:
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    We’re going to pass a health care plan written by a committee whose head says he doesn’t understand it,
    passed by a Congress that hasn’t read it but exempts themselves from it, signed by a president who also hasn’t read it, and who smokes, with funding administered by a treasury chief who didn’t pay his taxes, overseen by a surgeon general who is obese, and
    financed by a country that’s nearly broke.

    What possibly could go wrong?

  • October 30, 2009 at 2:23 am
    Allan says:
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    That’s funny.

  • October 30, 2009 at 2:32 am
    Allan says:
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    Yeah, Tort Reform would be huge. But, we’ll see.

    At this point I don’t care on how it ends up just as long as the uninsured are able to be insured, pre-existing conditions are no more and people who have coverage are not denied for b.s. reasons. And most importantly, it’s affordable for individuals and families.

  • October 30, 2009 at 3:38 am
    spins22 says:
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    How about we try to move the health industry, docs, hospitals, etc. to something completely different, why is health care reactionary? Why isn’t it proactive, why do we “wait” until people are sick or dying before we treat the illness, why can’t we put a program in place were we educate people, were we pay for healty choices, health clubs, YMCA, trainers, etc which seems to me would be less expensive then waiting until someone is sick and then fix em. Does that make sense?

  • October 30, 2009 at 4:13 am
    Holistic Doctor's Patient says:
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    My former doc was a holistic practitioner.
    He had been the head of an infectious disease department of a prominant hospital in New York State. He became disillusioned when he saw a number of patients coming in for tests and going out dead! People would get terrible infections while just getting tests. He went in for holistic medicine and he would treat me as whole human being not just honing in on the specific ailment. I was so nauseated and tired and depressed when I went to him. Ran a bunch of blood work, ekg, etc. He fixed me up with herbal tonics and some vitamins and mineral supplements. He would only prescribe traditional medicine if he had exhausted other alternative remedies. He said if you take one med. you might end up taking a number of meds to offset the side effects of the first med. Great guy; served in the Peace Corps; never rushed me; always felt like part of his family when I had my appointments. We need more docs like this one and thankfully his son is following in his footsteps.

  • October 30, 2009 at 4:14 am
    Joe says:
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    And I wish that everything I touch will turn to sugar and spice and all things nice. Wake up. It’s impossible. America doesn’t product enough wealth to cover what you want covered.

    There always will be poor people and no nation can ever provide to them everything.

    As to your comment about b.s. denials, Medicare’s denial rate is about 6.5% and it’s about 3.5% for private health ins. Yea, uncle Obamie the Commie will take real good care of you. Palin is right about the death panels.

  • October 30, 2009 at 5:39 am
    Allan says:
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    Not sure where you got those percentages and I’m not doubting them. But I found this as well:

    The California Nurses Association/National Nurses Organizing Committee, which looked at information insurance companies submitted to state regulators over a seven-year period. It’s true that CNA/NNOC announced in early September: “[R]esearchers analyzed data reported by the insurers to the California Department of Managed Care. From 2002 through June 30, 2009, six of the largest insurers operating in California rejected 47.7 million claims for care — 22 percent of all claims.”

    The six companies in question are PacifiCare, Cigna, Blue Cross, Kaiser Permanente, HealthNet and Aetna.

  • October 31, 2009 at 2:07 am
    Realist says:
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    Allan makes the statement: At this point I don’t care on how it ends up just as long as the uninsured are able to be insured, pre-existing conditions are no more and people who have coverage are not denied for b.s. reasons. And most importantly, it’s affordable for individuals and families.

    I would like to offer the following observations:
    1. Many of the uninsured are able to be insured, they just choose not to be insured until they need it and find themselves in a jam when they do. Others are non-citizens. Check what they stamp on your passport when you visit a “free healthcare” country. It says that you have no access to healthcare or government services.
    2. If you buy insurance when you are young, immortal, and not sick, there will not be any preexisting conditions.
    3. I agree that coverage should not be denied for b.s. reasons
    4. Insurance is affordable if you buy it when you are young and not sick. It is expensive when you try to buy it on the way to the hospital, which many people try to do.

    We do not need this new monstrosity, we need to allow free purchase across state lines, have a basic coverage plan that does not include unnecessary coverages like invitro fertilization or abortion for a 22 year old single male. We need a tax deduction (refundable credit) for individual purchase of health insurance that you can keep from your 22 year old healthy days with no loss of coverage when you change jobs or get laid off. Remember that insurance is based on the law of large numbers, not some political law passed to please an interest group. Health insurance today is not insurance, it is a maintenance contract. No matter how you try to display the poor unfortunate people who do not buy it but instead buy a big screen TV and live high on the hog only to cry on their way to the hospital that they are victims it is a personal choice that some people make and want someone else to pay for the result.

    There are a few relatively small things (compared to the latest proposal) that can be done to take care of this “crisis”, but they say never to waste a crisis.

    I loved the remark about running out of other people’s money. Priceless…



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