Florida on Alert for AOB Abuse as Irma Recovery Begins

By | September 13, 2017

  • September 13, 2017 at 4:13 pm
    Jack Kanauph says:
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    The day of the hurricane, there were lawyer ads on TV telling people to call them to help file their claims. Also by email and other social media. People need to file their claims with their carriers, then call their agents if they need more help or are not satisfied with the way the claim is going. Claimants don’t need to be shelling out 30-40% of their claim money to some attorney on the promise of more money.

    • September 13, 2017 at 5:36 pm
      Agent says:
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      Correct Jack. The fraudsters descend on a tragedy like locusts hoping to cash in. Many fall for their line and then they get ripped off. Roofers are the worst rip off artists and the elderly fall for it and then wonder where they went after paying money up front for repairs.

      • September 14, 2017 at 1:53 am
        Doug Fisher says:
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        I have to believe there is a special corner of hell reserved for these con artists. The thought that they prey on those that need help the most is absolutely disgusting to me.

        • September 14, 2017 at 12:25 pm
          Agent says:
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          We call them the “dregs” of society. Thugs, criminals who should be prosecuted and put away.

  • September 14, 2017 at 3:25 pm
    Dave says:
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    Jack — one issue I have seen and experienced are insurance agents unwilling to give “claims advice” due to their fear of E&O. From my perspective this is something the agent should provide rather than simply providing the company 800 number to report a claim. Another point in this chain are unscrupulous roofers.

    • September 16, 2017 at 8:40 am
      retired risk manager says:
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      Too late to worry about the E&O claim. The policy has already been sold. The real fear of the agent is the company’s reaction. And if the agent is a captive, well, good bye contract.

  • September 14, 2017 at 6:06 pm
    IRMA says:
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    “If unsure, agents are prepared to advise you and guide you through the claims process.”

    are you serious? Half the time they don’t even know what they’re selling!!!

    • September 18, 2017 at 10:31 am
      Agent says:
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      You are talking about Captives, aren’t you? Independent’s do tend to know what they are selling and they also complete 30 hours every two years in training to keep their licenses.

      • September 18, 2017 at 11:12 am
        Confused says:
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        If your comment is true, how come you kept telling me I needed to buy Renters Insurance even though you knew I owned the home outright?

  • September 14, 2017 at 6:08 pm
    IRMA says:
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    wait a minute.. if the claimants are shelling out 30-40% of their claim money.. then why is the insurance industry saying that litigation expenses for the carriers are through the roof? You’re talking out of both sides of your mouth. Is it one or the other? Maybe you should be thinking about how much you pay those defense attorneys that work on an hourly basis.

    • September 15, 2017 at 8:35 am
      CL PM says:
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      IRMA – my understanding is FL has a statute that says in a lawsuit, the losing side (most often insurance company) are required to pay plaintiff’s attorney fees over and above the policy limit. That seems to be the issue that causes the inflated claims costs as well as the aggressiveness of the attorneys and contractors. If someone knows this issue better than I, please let us know.

      • September 18, 2017 at 6:40 am
        Wayne says:
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        Florida’s statute requires the insurance carrier to pay the attorney’s fees incurred by the insured if they are awarded more than the company offered to settle the claim. The insured is never responsible for the legal costs of the insurance carrier and in an AOB situation, the legal bills for the company assigned the benefits of the policy are also paid by the insurance company if the court awards more than the company offered to settle the claim.

  • September 16, 2017 at 8:37 am
    retired risk manager says:
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    I’m shocked, shocked I say. You mean there are crooked attorneys! And yes, the agent SHOULD be helping their clients with a claim. If nothing more, a sit down with the insured to explain the policy provisions. But, sadly, over the years, I’ve met many agents who read no further than the large print of the policy. And continuing education. What a joke.

    • September 18, 2017 at 10:33 am
      Agent says:
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      There may be a good reason why you are retired.

      • September 18, 2017 at 1:36 pm
        Godot says:
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        Agent, paraphrasing a previous comment you’ve made….”Do you understand sarcasm?” Seriously.



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