Baltimore Now Requires Residential Fire Sprinklers

June 29, 2010

  • June 29, 2010 at 12:42 pm
    Increased-Rates says:
    Like or Dislike:
    Thumb up 0
    Thumb down 0

    Cue the water damage claims…

  • June 29, 2010 at 12:55 pm
    Bob says:
    Like or Dislike:
    Thumb up 0
    Thumb down 0

    With fewer fires to fight have these communities reduced fire department sizes or are they paying a fireman’s rate to people installing smoke detectors? Also does anyone know what the death rate is in new homes (built since the 1990s) that do not have sprinkler systems? – I’ll bet very few. And finally does anyone know the name of company that makes residential sprinkler systems that I can invest in or have the politians already purchased all of the stock available?

  • June 29, 2010 at 12:57 pm
    Rosie says:
    Like or Dislike:
    Thumb up 0
    Thumb down 0

    How can anyone be opposed to a simple measure that will save so many? Well I am sure Dick Cheney and the neo-cons would, but I am talking about sensible people.

  • June 29, 2010 at 1:52 am
    wudchuck says:
    Like or Dislike:
    Thumb up 0
    Thumb down 0

    well, when will we install a sensible people alert in our congressional office? sprinkler systems can be costly and then again, it can save lives. cost of saving the home versus it burning down and then cost of saving lives… you could only mandate that on the current construction, but here’s a problem — how many homes are being sold today? not many, so why would you want to increase the costs and then increase more homes on the market but no buyers? how much money could i save on a homeowner policy if i did have sprinklers in my home? now, if you look at it more closely, property taxes will go up because of these sprinklers and guess what – more money out of your pocket… um…um.. .and if these houses are not sold, who is on the hook?

  • June 29, 2010 at 2:05 am
    Evaluator says:
    Like or Dislike:
    Thumb up 0
    Thumb down 0

    What are the fire death statistics? They apparently did not look at added costs compared to benefits. Increases cost of house construction by about $1.5 per sq ft. How are systems monitored and what is cost of periodic inspections? What is impact on water pressure in the area? Not considered are increased costs of water damage when system malfunctions, or overkill in volume of water relative to size of fire. Are they making this requirement to shift fire department operating costs?

    Additionally, clearly it is not fair to require existing homes to be sprinkled, but that is where the real risk lies.



Add a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*