Industry Needs to Address Gaps in Workers’ Compensation, AMCOMP Panelists Say

By | October 25, 2016

  • October 25, 2016 at 4:10 pm
    Bob Burke says:
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    30 plus years ago a study was conducted on the disparity in work comp benefits and coverage levels between the states. A “White Paper” was issued that, in summary, declared that the Federal USL&H Statutes would be applied by the Federal Government if the offending states did not address their benefit and coverage issues. Much needs to be done with the laws, coverage and benefit deficiencies in work comp to bring the coverage intent and benefits into the 21st Century. Work comp is still at the level of the industrial revolution. Medical Benefits and premiums need to be moved out of work comp and into and under normal health insurance coverage, and the loss of wage benefit needs to be based on an employee’s gross earnings, combined for all current employments. The workforce of the 21st Century is faced with more part time employments, working multiple jobs, and an economy that demands a living wage. The employer is provided with the one-sided legal benefit of “exclusive remedy”. In the event of a significant injury, an employee is faced with significantly reduced earnings, very limited and highly controlled medical benefits, and the real possibility of never working again. Much needs to be done … or work comp should just go away an let the lawyers make havoc with the employers.

  • November 1, 2016 at 3:09 am
    Dina Padilla says:
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    After personally trying to navigate the CA workers comp system, trying to get benefits since 1988 is atrocious. Only the lawyers, ME’s, Copy companies among a few worthless other type of insurance entities received 95% of the claims and most of it done through fraud and corruption even with the murky and overlapping laws WHY? Because it was to save the employer from having to pay out on total permanent disability, medical care and in the very beginning unlimited vocational rehabilitation after not providing healthy and safe workplaces that started in the latter 80’s when pushing injured workers from temporary disability to SSA/Medicare and the afl-cio did help employers instead of their union members so industry and employers do manage to get along after all when it comes to saving ( don’t pay out benefits) and making money ( CEO pay packages & rebates) and more union dues… The WC court is joke because it always in favor of employers and just aide and abet to get the disabled to Social Security and Medicare. Exclusive remedy is an oxymoron for an injured worker expecting due process.
    A whole slew of insurance people including those who work in the state’s comp systems got to work for over 30 yeas with their high wages and in lieu benefits intact unlike the disabled injure workers who lost everything they worked for for decades and many their lives thanks to malpractice. So the WC insurance industry only needs to look at itself with it’s own incentive of greed to wonder why the feds will be taking over the state’s worker compensation systems and not any time too soon for me and the many ( millions to put into proper perspective) injured workers I know who have suffered egregiously for at least several decades with out real medical care, loss of wages, loss of everything they owned and including what their families lost. No one injured worker should have ever had to go through any loss created by a system that was intended only for itself, the employer and the states. So if the laws were made murky, laws falling over each other, then it was the insurance industry via lobbyists vying and going to legislator’s who made the system what it is today and for all intents and purposes, it was bound to happen eventually. So on HALLOWEEN DAY, I’m saying to workers compensation, R.I.P.2016!

  • November 10, 2016 at 3:05 pm
    Armando M. Castellini says:
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    The best, and the worst, things about Workers Comp is that virtually each state is different in the laws and the benefits. Unless, and until, they are made consistent, it will be impossible to make the necessary changes in the system. As an observer in the industry for over 65 years, I don’t expect the states themselves, or the industry, to ever make the necessary changes. And I’m not too unhappy with that situation. While I generally crave consistency, the one area where differences are good, and maybe necessary, is Workers Comp.



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