Pennsylvania Jury Awards $1.7M to Injured Little League Player Hit by Foul Ball

February 7, 2018

  • February 7, 2018 at 3:15 pm
    mrbob says:
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    Great decision. I am sure the parents signed a release not to sue and that they would indemnify and hold the league harmless for any injury to the child. That does not matter any more as little Johnny was hurt so someone has to play. Next thing we know if the courts continue to do these things is there will be no organized sports or public fields of any kind because you can not protect against everything and insurance will be so highly priced due to the risk.

    I just hate to see the world my son is going to be in.

    • February 7, 2018 at 4:24 pm
      Agent says:
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    • February 8, 2018 at 3:04 pm
      mikey says:
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      If this is a little league field, the dugout needs fencing. I have never seen a little league field dugout without fencing since my son has been playing the last 9 years. Kids aren’t sitting there glued to every play of the game at that age. It is hard to keep 10-15 kids focused. While the amount may be excessive, the entity that owns the field is responsible for not having that fencing. Foul balls fly off bats at dugouts soooo fast.

      • February 8, 2018 at 3:34 pm
        Agent says:
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    • February 8, 2018 at 4:08 pm
      GoldC says:
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      Hopefully he is into sports and you don’t face this issue.

      You need details before speculating. This wasn’t a very in-depth report.

    • February 12, 2018 at 12:08 pm
      mrbob says:
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      I am still perplexed after reading all of the responses, not one addressed the contractual risk transference that the parents most likely entered into willing. If the child was a participant regardless of all other factors ie fencing, bats etc the parents have a responsibility to observe the facilities used and protect Johnny from injury.

      Johnny on the other hand upon reaching the age of majority certainly has a strong case against all parties his parents included but am having a very hard time finding fault with the league from what I can see.

  • February 7, 2018 at 5:23 pm
    SICUW says:
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    How can you possibly get so upset about a case where you have almost no details whatsoever?

  • February 8, 2018 at 8:44 am
    Tony says:
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    this is just an initial award and the details are not clear. It could be a private club that is not protected the same way a school or municipality would be. These types of cases often have some outrageous jury award that gets abandoned or severely reduced in appeal. The assumed risk of foul balls during a sporting activity make this decision almost sure to be overturned. Also because the child was a participant, had he been a spectator it would have been easier to see the award being valid. I would be surprised if this actually gets paid.

  • February 12, 2018 at 11:09 am
    Mike says:
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    Part of the issue is the use of aluminum bats. We know this. We know the ball comes off an aluminum bat hotter than a wooden bat. I’m 50 and growing up as a ball player using wooden bats with that small sweet spot is a lot different than the kids bats today.

  • February 13, 2018 at 3:34 pm
    Walt says:
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    I hate to see a child get hurt while participating in any legal, logical recreational endeavor and, as a 20+ year youth recreational baseball coach, I think the ruling is just. With that said, parents/guardians must be willing to afford a small, additional sport registration cost or local tax to contribute to the purchase of the proper materials to insure their and all children’s safety. They must also be willing to contribute some of their time to help the other volunteer parents who try to make certain that all these preventative measures are properly in place.

  • February 13, 2018 at 5:17 pm
    Carolyn says:
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    Even if the parents sign a waiver prior to the injury, a child has rights to his physical well being and long term impact, particularly if an injury might result in lifelong health problems. A traumatic brain injury is not something to set aside and may impact his ability as an adult in a career or even in pursuing higher education. My guess is the court found the league guilty of neglect or would not have otherwise awarded the injury. I agree with SICUW, we don’t have enough details to really understand the decision.

  • February 14, 2018 at 4:25 pm
    Ken says:
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    mrbob is over-reaching with his comments. While there may be a waiver signed by the parents, mrbob should be glad that “gross negligence” such as not having the dugout protected by fencing, or allowing a kid up to bat without his helmet on, is not protected by an onerous waiver of liability that parents HAVE to sign.



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