Toymaker to Pay $1.1 Million Over Recalled Toy Dart Gun

October 18, 2011

  • October 18, 2011 at 10:31 am
    T Dubya B says:
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    Wonder how the market for the Johnny’s Bsg-O-Glass toy is going?

  • October 18, 2011 at 10:32 am
    Waterbug says:
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    So if there were small parts that an unwatched child could swallow, weren’t the parents aware of the danger? Why did they let their little children play with something dangerous? Do they leave fish hooks and open boxes of rat poison on the floor where toddlers can have fun with them?

    I deplore the loss of life of little ones but when did their caretakers lose all responsibilty for their care and well being?

    • October 18, 2011 at 1:38 pm
      The Other Point of View says:
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      I’m not sure I understand your point. Of course parents should be responsible for their children. Are you saying that toy companies should be able to manufacture toys that are dangerous if they so choose? Are you saying that, even though they are aware of the danger, they shoulld be allowed to continue selling their products?

      The rat poison and fish hooks aren’t placed in packages that say “Fun for ages 6-12!”

      • October 18, 2011 at 1:43 pm
        Anejo says:
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        I agree with OPofV. “Let the buyer beware” should not go for toys made for children

        • October 18, 2011 at 1:56 pm
          Dee says:
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          Then “let the buyer be SMART”.

  • October 18, 2011 at 1:29 pm
    Really? says:
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    The article tends to the facts of the investigation where Henry Gordy International knowingly withheld this information (that their toys were a health hazard) and by doing so, participated in the tragic deaths of these 3 victims.

    As a caring parent who frenetically watches over the health and care of their children, you cannot identify every potential health hazard. We all have a certain level of trust that the products we purchase for children are safe and granted, parents need to be aware of the potential hazards. All that aside, the settlement pales compared to the tort committed.

  • October 18, 2011 at 1:54 pm
    Dee says:
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    I would submit that any “toy” you purchase from a dollar store or similar retail establishment – or any “toy” for $1.50 is quite likely NOT going to be SAFE around a child small enough to want to put part of the toy in their mouth (and thus choke). Even if the toy is too large to be a choking hazard it is more than likely made from some plastic crap that you don’t want the kid mouthing.
    Getting back to personal responsibility and parental responsibility in current times is more critical than ever. These are hazardous times for our little inquisitive and explorative humans.

    Take responsibility for the safety of your children/our children!

    Maybe, just maybe, if we stop purchasing the junk that fills the isles of these stores we will ALL be better off! Less risk to the children, less plastic in the landfills.

    • October 18, 2011 at 2:07 pm
      The Other Point of View says:
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      If that’s the case, that any toy is not going to be safe, then the store shouldn’t be allowed to sell them.

      Yes, parents should accept responsibility for things that they purchase. But businesses have a responsibility too. They have a responsibility not to sell products that they know are going to hurt children.

      • October 18, 2011 at 2:32 pm
        Little Frog says:
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        Oddly enough, you’re both correct. The problem is that there will always be some opportunist anxious to sell inappropriate material and “parents” who are more interested in either being their buddy or to “just give the kid something to shut him up”. Frequently, the kid pays the price, someone writes out a check, and the world forgets and moves on.

  • October 18, 2011 at 2:06 pm
    GL GURU says:
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    Just 1.1mm? I say they got off pretty light.

  • October 18, 2011 at 2:14 pm
    Frank says:
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    Absolutely ridiculous!!! There are hundreds, if not thousands of objects in every home that could be considered choking hazards!!! Toys, pencaps, coins, grapes, sticks, stones… anything can become a choking hazard. Case should have been tossed out!

    Hey, these keys on my keyboard look kinda tasty. I’m hoping Dell has a good legal team!!!

    • October 18, 2011 at 10:20 pm
      Former Status Quo says:
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      If the kid swallows a quarter do you get to sue the treasury and ultimately the president, think proximate cause.

  • October 18, 2011 at 4:18 pm
    Lou says:
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    I bet the toy maker found the $1.1m tough to swallow.

  • October 18, 2011 at 4:52 pm
    bob says:
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    My boy choked on a nickle (surgically removed and thankfully he survived) when he was three and yes I felt guilty about leaving change out where he got it but I did not ask the government to start making money larger or recall their coins. I remember when dart guns with removeable rubber tips (as well as bean guns, beebee guns, rubber band guns, sling shots) were owned by all the neighbor kids and we’d go out and shoot each other (you’re going to put someone’s eye out)- funny I never saw any one eyed kids running around our block. The manufacturer was not negligent stuff happens in any environment. We have too many laws and lawsuits to protect us from ourselves. Our mothers have taken over the consumer protection department.

    • October 18, 2011 at 5:26 pm
      The Other Point of View says:
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      I’m happy your son survived what could have been a real tragedy. But you miss the point. The nickel wasn’t marketed and manufactured for children to play with them. If you make a product that is designed to be used by children….and you know that children will be injured using your product…you have a legal and moral responsibility to eithe r make it so that they can’t get injured using it, or don’t make it. I’ll go further. If you make a product you know will harm chilrdren, and you encourage children to use it, and a child dies because of your callous disregard, you should be jailed.

      • October 18, 2011 at 10:23 pm
        Former Status Quo says:
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        One word: Legos. They are one of the smallest and most commonly played with toys. They can injure children and they probably send hundreds to the ER a year. I don’t see legos making changes to their product other than hitting up the latest kiddie kraze: harry potter, star wars, lord of the rings, etc.

        • October 19, 2011 at 12:04 pm
          The Other Point of View says:
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          Legos packaging is marked with the age range recommended. If you check out their products, the stuff marketed to toddlers have much larger lego pieces, too large to swallow.

          • October 19, 2011 at 2:22 pm
            Hank says:
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            That’s great… if you don’t have more than one child. Rather than have age appropriate ranges, perhaps toys should have age INAPPROPRIATE ranges. ie, “This toy is not appropriate for families who have children in the 0-4 age range, as well as families where the parents chose not to be responsible parents.”

            That should cover it, right?



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