Insurance Veterans’ Forecasts for 2012

By | January 5, 2012

  • January 5, 2012 at 2:55 pm
    Peter Polstein says:
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    Good afternoon all. I’ve read the commontary of these good folks and while not attempting to be a one trick pony, having written on this subject for a while, I’m surprised that the question of regulatory substantial changes current in the final stages hasn’t brought what may well be a significant economic problem to the fore front. Clearly the “marriage” of FASB & IASB whose prior segregation left clearly two different basis of both stress tests and capital adequacy, now rings new bell as this international reality becomes a major segment of financial reporting. Little has been written relative the financial realities of this, and the potential prolific consequences eminating from this marriage. The basis by which reinvesting had subsequently been agreed will change, thresh hold requirements will be re-evaluated and what had been sacrosanct in the past as to reserving and actuarial techniques will now receive more scrutiny. With the advent of Solvency II, assuming they can finally arrive at some consensus will be part of the overall domestic and non domestic model. All of this will have a potentially dramatic effect on those of us who represent the client base, be it, broker, agent or consultant, It will clearly require far more scrutiny as to the choosing of insurers which will fall within the mitigation of risk assessment. There may well be a surplus or capacity, but there may well also be a surplus of insurers who in the end will find themselves in positions that they may well not have believed possible a half decade ago.

    Be well all
    Pete

  • January 5, 2012 at 3:37 pm
    Systemic risk says:
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    Just love that section from Chartis, A/K/A AIG, executive Johnson complaining about overcapacity & razor thin margins. If AIG had been allowed to fail, then the prudent carriers would now have pricing power! Instead they have to compete with zombie companies like AIG that are 80% owned by the taxpayers. Are the other carriers remaining silent, so that when Europe implodes, they will not be excluded from their own taxpayer bailout?

    • January 8, 2012 at 1:29 am
      Observer says:
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      I agree totally. Chartis has been overly competitive be be reviewing their approach on pricing.

  • January 5, 2012 at 6:26 pm
    Anejo says:
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    Not one word regarding the world ending in December?



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