Medical Don’ts: Doctors Identify Unnecessary, Harmful Tests, Treatments

By | February 21, 2013

  • February 21, 2013 at 6:15 pm
    Agent says:
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    I am convinced that many doctors practice defensive medicine due to fear of Malpractice claims. Tort Reform was not put into Obamacare as it should have been. There is no doubt many tests are ordered that are unnecessary. This drives up the cost of healthcare. Perhaps doctors are also not doing their job and are lacking some common sense or are not trained as well in diagnosis. Medicine is so specialized that it sometimes takes several of them to figure out what is wrong and do the proper treatment. My wife had to go to 6 different doctors to get her ankle problems diagnosed and surgery performed after numerous tests. Each referred doctor had to do their own tests. It was a joke.

  • February 25, 2013 at 11:17 am
    Jim O'HAre RPLU AIC AIS says:
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    A few things from a med mal claims pro since 1985. – Medical professional liability insurance, and the kind you buy from Humana or blue cross have zero relationship.

    Defensive medicine should be cheap and often reveals a diagnosis. Curious that the article states that + PAP smears are “almost always,” due to a virus. A cheap testand hope it aint you!! EKG, cheap and can document cardiac health.

    A fact- 87% of med mal is generated from 13% of physicians. Focus on the 13 choices are retraining or remove from the system.
    The cost of health care is its own problem. Profit causes the provider to provide the least. You get McDonalds when you should have Ruths Chris. Less is better from the business guy right?
    Maybe you are talking about defensive medicine due to the fear of med mal. These tests, that are considered extra, should be the standard if they reveal a diagnosis.

    Get Rid of Mccarron Ferguson which allows a federal OK, since 1949, allowing anti trust for med mal companies, the humanas and baseball. Open the markets over state lines and see the rates drop. Competition for our dollar.

    Kudos to the lobbyists to defer focus from the real problem. The license to steal and coining the term healthcare. Is it really?
    It is catastrophe coverage at best. It aint Healthcare. you pay a huge premium to satisfy a huge deductible so you can them figure out a copay- The Doc gets screwed to boot. What a deal?

    Want to cut med mal? – more nurses, better staffing, shorter shifts, better communication and lose the 72 hour weekend resident shifts. This arcane hazing ritual is stupid. lets address the gorillas in the room first. It is EZ

    There is too much med mal, much unreported. From my view, 90% related to fatigue, communication and staffing inefficiency. We as Americans dont fix things on the front end, we are reactionary. Get more nurses.

    Re caps – they are needed for pain and suffering,( only) argue the amount. It is subjective and cant be measured with a ruler nor weighed.

    The fixes are easier than stated. Give me all the tests at a better price. When BCBS starts selling professional liability insurance, only then, will I connect one to the other.
    regards Jim O’Hare RPLU AIC AIS

  • February 25, 2013 at 11:23 am
    Jim O'HAre RPLU AIC AIS says:
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    Lets see- profit as a motive instead of health will never work. Give those in need the minimum and only after we drain them dry. The fix is in.

    When Blue cross starts selling professional liability insurance to docs, I will then connect med mal and healthcare cost relationships.

    profit motive by its definition provides less care and the lowest price, or highest price. low for them high for us.

    I get to pay a huge premium on top of my Boss’s. In order to satisfy a horrendous deductible, so I can engineer a copay. This is a great business model. Kudos to the lobbyists and marketing guys. When do they pay? Chances of health and care- slim. Give me all the tests.

    Dont ignore the big gorilla’s in the room fighting the elephant’s. The fixes are much simpler than those offered. I have dozens.

    A few things from a med mal claims pro since 1985. – Medical professional liability insurance, and the kind you buy from Humana or blue cross have zero relationship..

    The cost of health care is its own problem. Profit causes the provider to provide the least. You get McDonalds when you should have Ruths Chris. Less is better from the business guy right?

    Maybe you are talking about defensive medicine due to the fear of med mal. These test , that are considered extra, should be the standard if they reveal a diagnosis.

    Get Rid of Mccarron Ferguson which allows a federal OK, since 1949, allowing anti trust for med mal companies, the humanas and baseball. Open the markets over state lines and see the rates drop. Competition for our dollar.
    Jim O’Hare RPLU AIC AIS- also a litigation paralegal and x ray tech

    • February 25, 2013 at 2:59 pm
      Agent says:
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      Two long posts saying the same thing Jim. I agree with much of it, but you don’t mention all the ambulance chasing lawyers out there eager to take from the medical profession as much as they can. If there is not Tort Reform, the Health profession will continue to practice defensive medicine by ordering unneeded tests. Surgeons are paid to operate. They sometimes do surgery when surgery was just an option. I do agree that residents are run into the ground with the hours they make them work and fatigue can be an issue if mistakes are made. Surgeons who have back to back surgeries also have problems from time to time and leave instruments in patients which causes further problems and sometimes death.

  • February 27, 2013 at 10:24 am
    FabIns says:
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    I am wondering if these procedures are no longer allowable under ObamaCare. Seems peculiar that suddenly, after decades of history, suddenly they are put back there with blood-letting.



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