No Yahoo, Insurer Likes Work-at-Home Employees

By | March 1, 2013

  • March 1, 2013 at 12:38 pm
    Huh! says:
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    Being a telecommute employee would be nice, but it makes it tough to shut the door behind you when you leave work at the end of the day.

  • March 1, 2013 at 1:33 pm
    Insurance is my name says:
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    I have the ability to work from home at my job one day a week if I want but after I drop my son off at day care, it’s about the same drive into the office as it is to my house, so why bother? My company is flexible and works with employees to work at home. If someone is sick, I can work from home. The downside is if there is snow and the office is closed, I can work from home but that usually means the kids and hubby are home as well, so I just make the drive into the office so they don’t bother me.

  • March 1, 2013 at 1:52 pm
    Insurance Professional says:
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    I’ve held positions where I would work from home all the time. While the benefits of not having to deal with traffic, casual attire, I prefer the office life. Why? When I worked from home I felt more like an island rather than being part of a team. I also found it difficult to balance work and personal life as the work was only a couple of feet away. Of course I may be unique in this viewpoint, I applaude employers who have the vision to understand what works for one employee may not work for another. Too bad Yahoo doesn’t recoginzie this. But obviously Hartford does.

  • March 1, 2013 at 2:00 pm
    Comm'l Acct Mgr says:
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    Cloistered in an office for years, then to avoid the 3 hr commute on public transit each day, I worked very happily and productively at home. I was able to avoid getting caught up in those office chit-chats with people who didn’t know how to end a conversation. No interruptions at home so I could focus better on big tedious projects. If I got tired, I’d take a short nap during my lunch hour – very invigorating for the remainder of the day. Saved plenty of money on buying lunches everyday ($7-10 daily), ate healthier lunches at home. Saved $ in commute expenses. Only downside for me was increase in gas & electric bill. Did I say productive? I never felt more productive than when I was working at home. An empty nester now but I can see the value of working from home when raising a family. So much better for society to have a parent at home after school than to be raising latch-key kids who run around and get into mischief.

  • March 1, 2013 at 2:09 pm
    Personal Experience says:
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    My wife works from home about once a week. Her company used to encourage many employees to do so even more often. Due to too many employees abusing the system, they no longer allow as much as they use to. Some can handle the separation of home and work. Some cannot. The difficulty for most employers is figuring out who can do it effectively and who cannot. The next worry is if you allow it for some but not for others and it happens to fall within certain percieved racial or gender lines, are subjecting yourself to possible suits. Much easier to manage employees from an office than it is from a computer to see if they are working.

  • March 1, 2013 at 4:31 pm
    GoldenGirl says:
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    Sitting Disease ! “There are days when I sit at my desk, and I don’t move all day,” said Saunders, This is not healthy – she must not have heard the latest research. I would think one advantage of working from home is it would be easier to take short exercise/walking breaks, instead of being stuck at your desk all day.

  • March 1, 2013 at 5:05 pm
    watcher says:
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    I think that even today there is a level of distrust between some manager and their employees. If they can’t see them working at their desks then they are goofing off. others don’t care as much as long as you get your work done. I like doing it from time to time when I need to concentrate on a project as the accoustics in our office are horrible but do feel that there is value in face to face collaboration,so for me the ideal is a flexible situation based on trust between manager and employee.

    • March 4, 2013 at 10:45 am
      insurance professional says:
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      In my current manager role I have team members in two office locations in different states. The level of trust I have with my team is the same regardless of location. In my opinion,if a manager can not monitor, coach and train remote team members, this most likely lack of skills on the manager or perhaps a manager that likes to micromange everthing and everyone. Of course the skill and experience level of the employee has a huge baring on this. I can’t imagine supervising entry level workers remotely.

      • March 4, 2013 at 11:15 am
        Irene O says:
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        Insurance Professional you’re observations are right on point. If you hire, coach and train highly knowledgeable & expereinced talent; working remotely can be benefital for both parties. Professionalism, good communication, flexibility and mutual respect are important keys to success. Working remotely doesn’t mean clients should ever hear your barking dog or crying baby. Clients must receive the same professional care whether your serving their needs from a remote office or HQ. And yes, sometimes being remote means you work a bit past quiting time, but if the flexibility is there for you it needs to be there for the employer as well.

  • March 2, 2013 at 10:43 am
    tn5rr2012 says:
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    There are pros and cons to everything what a person has to do along with companies is find out what works the best for them. Some people thrive in a home work environment whereas some people need the interaction with people. I work from home but I also make sure I get up during the day, move about and get the blood flowing. I also interact with people outside the home.

  • March 2, 2013 at 11:30 am
    Patty mcClain says:
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    Let’s not forget the cost of day care for our children. Not that I object to their rates but for the single, working mother, $700-1200 a month for a couple of pre-K children is hardly worth it!

    • March 4, 2013 at 10:48 am
      insurance professional says:
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      From my personal experience with other coworkers, I saw young children in the home as problem in gettng work done. My coworkers was a hard working contributor. The only problem is that she did not work the core office hours so our customers could reach her because she was tending to her children until her husband got home. Once that occurred, then she would log on and work until Midnight. Again she worked very hard and got a lot done, but if you need to be available for your customers at certain times, you need to be available and not trying to save day care dollars.

    • March 11, 2013 at 12:15 pm
      Hmmmmm says:
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      Patty… if you are caring for your child, I would think it would be difficult (if not impossible) to focus on your work. It would be almost the same thing as bringing your child to the office. If you are working from home, you still will need to make arrangements for someone to care for your child while you are working. SOMETIMES working from home, means some flexible hours as well, which means you may be able to come up with economical alternatives for the child care (that is still safe).

  • March 4, 2013 at 12:56 pm
    Jeff says:
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    After decades of commuting I started working from my home full-time in 2010. My particular job is testing software (for insurance companies). This job really lends itself to shutting myself away from distractions and plugging away. If my job involved more interaction with other employees or customers, I think working at home would be more difficult. As good as the on-line meeting technology is, there is really no substitute for being there. Also, I am in my 60s. If I were still concerned about becoming a VP I would not work from home- the lack of social interaction would be a problem. On the other hand, I hope to work past my nominal retirement age, and not commuting improves my long-term ability to work.

  • April 16, 2013 at 10:28 pm
    Delma Scampoli says:
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    These days, working at home isn’t just a pipe dream — it’s an economic necessity. The Great Recession forced more than 300,000 stay-at-home moms to return to work. And in a recent retirement poll commissioned by Allstate, nearly 70% of near-retirees said they plan to continue working past age 65. *



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