Colleges Could Face Lawsuits Following Supreme Court Affirmative Action Ruling

By John Hechinger and | June 26, 2013

  • June 26, 2013 at 1:46 pm
    Jay says:
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    Schools will argue for affirmative action because they won’t get the governmental subsidies without affirmative action.

    Let’s go to Affirmative Action II then: The admissions application should not include what color or race or reliqion you are. Period. If you apply and are qualified you gain a spot. Otherwise you don’t. Period.

    • June 26, 2013 at 1:53 pm
      jw says:
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      It does seem simple, doesn’t it?

    • June 26, 2013 at 1:57 pm
      Jack Allen says:
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      Now Jay that would be racist. You see 2+2 does not equal 4 in some areas these days. Our current President is the perfect example of what you get when diversity is valued over job skills.

      • June 27, 2013 at 1:46 pm
        Hold on a Sec says:
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        While I’m no fan of the President: I can acknowledge his merit, at least as a legal professor. The President started getting noticed when he became Editor of the Harvard Law Review, a position that is based on merit, not quotas or bonus points for minority status.

        One could argue that he would have ‘shown through’ sooner had the shadow of affirmative action not obscured his post graduate success.

  • June 26, 2013 at 3:14 pm
    J.S. says:
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    I get it. You want things to be “fair” and you believe that eliminating information on race, gender,etc from the admissions process would make it “fair”. It sounds so simple, doesn’t it.

    Unfortunately, it isn’t quite that simple.

    In the real world, the playing field isn’t level. It’s been slanted against many groups including minorities, women, gays, etc. Affirmative action is a meager, and at times, somewhat inadequate, attempt to provide everyone with fair access to the education it takes to succeed.

    It is a shame that the Supreme Court took away this attempt to create true fairness.

  • June 26, 2013 at 3:14 pm
    sheltowee says:
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    Why can’t universities use common sense and fairness in admissions? Simply using ACT scores and written applications. NO photos, no interviews. Apps and scores, only.

    Our legislatures really need to spend our tax dollars on correcting the corruptions in our public, higher education.

    Right now our public colleges are roll over, greeding money making machine. Charging a tuition amount in one year that should be the total cost of a 4 year degree.

    They over book and set a quota for themselves to flunk 50% of the Freshman and sophmores in order to make room for the new ones coming the next year.

    The university towns are set up to exploit the students and the parents with high cost, low quality housing. They think nothing of the individual student or their families.

    The university towns set the stage by allowing drunken off campus housing parties. They profress ingnorance but actually reap benefits when they occur with claims made to the families insurance companies for new flooring, fixtures, structual, etc.

    University counselors are heartless and incencitive to the students true needs. They are simply recruiters for certain insructors and game players in the meet the flunking student quota. They talk kids into taking classes they don’t need, violation a trust the parents have with the univeristy to guide their students and prepare them.

    For the ones who are lucky enough to graduate. The majority are rewarded with a mountain of debt and no job, because they had been lied to and exploited.

    The public univerities do not care about higher education. They only care about the MONEY. They don’t care about your kid and they definately don’t care about you!

  • June 26, 2013 at 4:23 pm
    Agent says:
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    I have a partner who has a son who wanted to go to Medical School. He had the grades, the Pre Med courses and was eligible in all ways to get in. He couldn’t get into any school in the US because they were admitting so many foreigners and Affirmative Action students that we know weren’t any more qualified than he was. After several frustrating attempts, he had to go to a Medical School in the Caribean and has done well. He hopes he can intern in America, but who knows where he will land?

    • June 27, 2013 at 3:47 pm
      Libby says:
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      How do you know they weren’t more qualified than he was? Just because he is American?

  • June 26, 2013 at 4:31 pm
    No Doubt says:
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    I don’t think that targeting colleges and universities is the answer for various minority groups. primary and secondary education is not the same for all kids and as a result not all kids are equally prepared for college or a working life. we need to find ways of improving our public schools to the point where all kids learn and then the best and brightest get to go to our elite schools irregardless of sex race or other preferences. And its not about spending more but we really need to overhaul an educational system that had its roots in a 19th century industrial and agricultural model and make it relevant to a 21st century model that rewards technology and innovation.
    Unfortunately, the gov’tl beaureaucrats and teachers and even many parents are unwilling to give up their entrenched positions for the benefit of our children.

    • June 28, 2013 at 8:39 am
      jw says:
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      That’s a very good point. We have to improve K-12 so that all kids get the best primary education. Of course, then we have to provide teachers who can actually teach. yeah, that’s gonna happen.

    • June 28, 2013 at 1:18 pm
      Don't Call Me Shirley says:
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      Well said!

  • June 26, 2013 at 6:14 pm
    Baxtor says:
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    This is the problem with our government today. They start something that probably was needed at one time, but they cannot ever end anything. They do a temporary tax increase, but never get rid of it. They start farm subsidies but never remove them. They start power company subsidies so people in rural areas can have electricity, but now that they do, they don’t get rid of it. They start affirmative action, but now in the 21st Century, they don’t get rid of it.

    • June 27, 2013 at 3:52 pm
      Libby says:
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      I do think there is still a need in the 21st century for leveling of the playing field. We have not yet evolved into a nation where people do not have bias against certain races and ethnic backgrounds. And I think the other point of the article is promoting diversity in an educational setting. If everyone looks like you, talks like you, and thinks like you, you are not likely to get the well-rounded education needed to live in this world. And that can only perpetuate the bias’ already existing.

      • June 28, 2013 at 9:30 am
        Agent says:
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        Libby, the public schools, particularly in the metro areas really aren’t teaching anything to equip students for the 21st Century. The union infested schools are more interested in their benefit package rather than teaching. FFA will tell you that in Chicago, they have the highest salaries and benefits and the worst record for drop outs in the country. They place kids who can learn with those who are incorrigible and can’t learn. What kind of preparation is that for being good productive citizens in the future?

        • June 28, 2013 at 11:08 am
          Libby says:
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          I’m not precluding improving the primary education in this country, but that wasn’t the topic of the article. That’s a whole separate topic that I’m sure we will argue about at another time.

        • June 28, 2013 at 11:54 am
          Captain Planet says:
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          My little sister is an Assistant Principal in Peoria (IL) District 150. I have NEVER heard her talk about her benefits package. I have heard countless stories about her trying to improve the educational atmosphere and specifically, for children with autism and other learning disabilities. She sees many successes coming from her district. I substitute taught for awhile in the same district, years ago. I, too, saw many bright and motivated students. It was a highly rewarding experience and I’m glad I had a semester with everyone I helped. They actually helped me, too. What do “they” say, the teacher becomes the student, right? I certainly did in many instances. I have so much respect for those invovled in the public education arena. Heck, the private educational arena as well. They aren’t appreciated enough.



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