How to Make a Driverless Car Blameless

By Ian King | October 19, 2017

  • October 19, 2017 at 1:25 pm
    Ben Dover says:
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    This is utter nonsense. The standards they are looking for are “norms” which will be set by government but will not necessarily reflect all real word situations. There will clearly be cases in which the car was not adequately programmed simply because a programmer and computers can not possibly account for the quadrillions of variables in the real world. Things that are simple for a person to understand are not for a computer. Think black ice, think wind, think flooding across a road, think ice covering a sensor. What Intel is doing is simply saying “here is a baseline and we want politicians to release us from liability for anything outside of this”. Simple fact is that computers cannot make all the decisions that a good driver makes over the course of their driving lifetime and certainly not as quickly. It would take a 100 trillion lines of code to do a fraction of it. What will happen is that human drivers are going to lose all of or freedom to account for these terminator cars and we will end up paying the insurance bills as well since Intel is lying in order to aide the political class.

    • October 19, 2017 at 2:33 pm
      Agent says:
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      Good one Ben. You are making too much sense for the mindless computer crowd. By the way, Tesla’s sensor did not recognize an 18 wheeler. Oops, computer error.

      • October 26, 2017 at 4:17 pm
        George Lee says:
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        Tesla said this one was the driver’s fault. Bottom line,—if an accident should occur, it is your fault. If there are no accidents, it’s Tesla’s expertise that prevented all those accidents that didn’t happen.

    • October 19, 2017 at 4:03 pm
      Jack Kanauph says:
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      So what if you are driving down an interstate at 70 mph in busy traffic and you come upon a car with engine trouble and the occupants go outside the car. Will my speeding car slow down to a safe speed around pedestrians, like 15 mph? That will cause an accident or traffic jam…

      • October 24, 2017 at 4:53 pm
        Rosenblatt says:
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        Unless you stop across all lanes of travel, it won’t cause a traffic jam as vehicles behind you will be traveling at a safe enough distance to adjust their speed accordingly and make a lane-change if needed. There’s a great video out there if you google “simple solution to traffic”

  • October 19, 2017 at 2:02 pm
    caffiend says:
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    Or as an alternative we can force the adoption of self-driving cars by banning the use of human operated vehicles outside of a racetrack. Taking the human driver variable out of the equation will help.

    • October 19, 2017 at 3:59 pm
      Jack Kanauph says:
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      That’s a good point. This driverless car thing is going to ruin NASCAR.

  • October 19, 2017 at 2:37 pm
    Glenn Oliver says:
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    Intel go tell the supercar (Corvette, Ferrari, Porsche, Lambo, etc.) that they cannot drive their cars because the human driver is too stupid vs. Intel’s chips and sensors.
    This is utter BS. No computer can come close to duplicating what the brain does instantly while driving.

  • October 19, 2017 at 3:31 pm
    Glennie says:
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    After seeing what a mess the electronics “Weenies” have made of Windows 10, I’m sure that this won’t be successful within my lifetime!

  • October 19, 2017 at 4:20 pm
    Dave says:
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    There is no doubt in my mind that driverless cars will be safer than human driven cars. Its a scientific fact. Humans are terrible drivers letting anger, stupidity, lack of attention, alcohol, drugs, disobeying the law, running away from police, etc, etc. get in the way of safe driving. Thousands less people will die each year once this has been implemented for a while. But computer driven cars will not be perfect, just better. That being said I find the comment of programming them to be legally faultless as laughable. Fault is determined by juries consisting of humans just as flawed as drivers are. Being in insurance I’ve seen juries assign blame to those who are absolutely blameless. Self driving cars will not make this go away.

  • October 19, 2017 at 5:35 pm
    JustAThought says:
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    I like the idea of a self-driving car, but I’m still nervous about the details in the programming.

    I think a better plan would be for self-driving cars to start as taxi services manned with human drivers monitoring the machine’s ability to drive. The human’s job wouldn’t be to drive the vehicle unless the machine gets stuck or has an emergency. It would still ultimately be the responsibility of the driver to ensure the vehicles does things safely, but it would also allow the tech industry to modify the computer reactions in real time. I kind of thought Uber was already working with this idea with their driving service?

  • October 20, 2017 at 8:17 am
    CL PM says:
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    Until my desktop, laptop, iPad and iPhone never need to be re-booted or shut down to resolve a problem, I’ll continue driving my own car. I just don’t see enough evidence that computers can run faultlessly to completely turn my car over to one. I do look forward to more and more “driver assist” technology as that is already reducing accidents, but I’m not ready to go 100% driverless.

  • October 20, 2017 at 9:19 am
    Yes says:
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    This is exactly it!

    Look t all the comments – everyone is against or at the very least extremely skeptic of what these driverless cars will be like. I’m with everyone too. I just think it is hilarious that people would feel more comfortable stepping into the hyperloop than the possibility of stepping in a driverless car.

  • October 23, 2017 at 9:48 am
    Barry Gair says:
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    Question for the author and/or suggestion for follow up article: Presuming this takes, how will the software in cars on the road update as the technology updates. By way of example, Garmin or TomTom require manual updates to their maps or they become increasingly inaccurate as time goes by and roads change. And, the older a phone get’s the more issues it has as individual apps update and get buggy with older phones on which an app has been loaded. How will cars with 2020 software interact with, say, a car with 2022 software? As the technology advances, if manual vs. automatic updates are required to keep cars on a level playing field in order to keep autonomous vehicle accidents to an acceptable level, there are bound to be a multitude of issues.



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