Why Storm-Prone States Continue to Balk at Tough Building Codes

By | March 19, 2018

  • March 19, 2018 at 2:41 pm
    Hmmmmmmm says:
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    And people wonder why NFIP is so upside down

    • March 20, 2018 at 8:42 am
      Cut the Bias says:
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      You could say the program is…under water.

      • March 21, 2018 at 8:18 am
        Rosenblatt says:
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        I sea what you did there! :)

  • March 19, 2018 at 8:40 pm
    County Line says:
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    Just follow the money to the pockets of the largest beneficiary of all the new, cheaper-built houses. Those pockets belong to local & state governments. Their ever-expanding thirst for more money guarantees more cheap homes to tax, as opposed to fewer quality homes able to withstand catastrophes better. Call it what it is: Institutionalized short-term thinking.

    • March 20, 2018 at 9:16 am
      Tax Cuts 4 PolaRich Bears says:
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      True. There are also incentives to build such houses on risky, low-cost-real-estate instead of following a long-term plan to mitigate flood exposure by evacuating flood prone zones over 5 decades, and converting them into parks, commercial warehouses with water impervious lower floors, elevated roadways, seasonal hiking/ biking/ camping trails, etc. Only planners / politicians with a long term perspective on current problems will begin to solve this problem.

      • March 20, 2018 at 3:17 pm
        confused says:
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        where is the government going to get all this money to pay all those people to move, complete all the construction you speak of and maintain it year after year?

  • March 20, 2018 at 9:06 am
    Brian says:
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    The IBHS report rates Florida as 95/100, improving 1 point from its 2015 study and states, “Florida continues to be a leader in building code safety.” It does note concern for bypassing IRC changes, but in fairness the IJ article should have discussed Florida’s rating in the report that the article is about.

  • April 2, 2018 at 12:00 pm
    Steve says:
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    Stupid is what stupid does. There is a reason for code requirements, which are at best a design minimum to be incorporated into building designs. Now there are going to be even less minimum requirements due to greedy City officials and builders. The only beneficiaries of reduced code compliance, are the builders and developer who don’t care since they go away 1-yr after building completion when their warranty ends. Unfortunately the taxpayer has to constantly bail out the building owners when major disasters occur and buildings are destroyed or flooded as is typical in a 100-year flood plain, or storm belt.

    Codes should be national and allow only limited local amendments, and buildings should be designed and built to last 50+ years not 50 minutes. No quality accrues in the noted downsizing of the already minimal code requirements.

  • April 9, 2018 at 9:59 am
    Tom says:
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    There seems to be a good bit missing from this article. Florida is not reducing anything. Florida is still using the I codes and still reviewing the changes every three years as it always has. The ONLY change is they are not re adopting the entire code every three years, just the changes. IF you participated, you would realize how costly and burdensome it is to adopt 97% of the same code all over again every three years. Building officials barely have any time to learn and properly enforce the code before it changes again. Nothing is lessening, nothing is a payoff and Florida should still carry it’s top rating. Lets take an honest look at the meat. Florida is the ONLY state to require mandatory permits, inspections and labeling of Hurricane protection products. Other highly rated states that change the I codes every three years have good programs on paper, but the reality on the ground (which is what matters) is that more than 50% of the hurricane protection products installed are done without permit, done with products that do not meet the necessary installation minimums and many are done with products that cannot comply with the I code’s ASTM required standards. This is not my opinion. I see it every day. I could call out massive violations to the I codes in every state relating to Impact protective devices (hurricane shutters). The hurricane standards in the I codes have NEVER been lessened and never will be. This does not even touch on the I codes wood structural panel provision (plywood exception for hurricane protection), which has been proven to be severely deficient in anchorage and is still in use in many states and is being used on thousands or even 10’s of thousands of new homes.
    For the record, I think we build the cheapest homes that the code will allow as it is. I firmly believe we should build stronger, but let’s not beat a false horse.



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