Smart Home Product Security Risks Can Be Alarming

By TAMARA DIETRICH, The Daily Press | January 3, 2019

  • January 3, 2019 at 2:33 pm
    vox sanitus says:
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    Folks, if you want a smart home, you go right ahead. As for me, I am smart enough for both me and my home.

    • January 3, 2019 at 2:40 pm
      Agent says:
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      Hackers are always one step ahead and if they are thieves, everyone is at risk. I have an alarm on my home that might be able to be hacked, but I also have a sign out front that will deter 99% of all thieves from trying to break in.

  • January 3, 2019 at 3:07 pm
    CO_yeti says:
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    Indoor plumbing, toilets, electricity, heated water, dishwashers, etc were all cutting edge technology at one point and all carry increased risks to your home. Seems like progress and convenience ultimately wins out.

    • January 3, 2019 at 4:02 pm
      Augustine says:
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      Yes, but burglars very seldom enter your home through the dishwasher.

      • January 3, 2019 at 4:46 pm
        CO_yeti says:
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        Its still much easier to break a window or pick a lock than hack your smart door. The risk of being burglarized is not increased at all. No matter how you protect your home you should have things of true value in a safe. Same goes for financial documents. A dishwasher that has been leaking for a period of time can easily cause $10,000 of damage. Financially the risks aren’t that dissimilar, it just feels like they are.

  • January 3, 2019 at 4:55 pm
    Augustine says:
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    CO_yeti, I think the point of the article–and the dangers of the “internet of things” in general–is that the risks of being burglarized or your privacy being invaded are indeed greater due to the advances in device connectivity. The “internet of things” gives hackers access to spaces where they historically have not had any. A decade ago the biggest risks were hackers invading your personal computer, but now, a hacker can commandeer your smart tv, your laptop camera or your child’s toy (there are real world examples of all of these happening and they are all incredibly creepy).

    • January 3, 2019 at 7:01 pm
      CO_yeti says:
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      Everything carries risk. Emerging technology carries unfamiliar risk, but that doesn’t mean the net increase is higher.
      For example: the risk a hacker could steal my identity is real, however the level of skill needed to randomly target home networks hoping to find both an open router and someone with valuable info is almost a waste of time which is why it doesn’t really happen… but it could. What actually is a high risk to the average American is some low level identity theft ring stealing their mail, a waiter skimming their credit card, losing their unlocked phone, or porch pirates grabbing their packages.
      Same with the home. I’m sure in the near future some jerk will steal from a house by hacking the electronic door lock. But before that happens I’m certain thousands of homes will have a window smashed by a drug addict looking for pills and easy to grab jewelry.

      • January 4, 2019 at 11:23 am
        Augustine says:
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        CO_yeti. I agree.



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