Florida Delays Employee Drug Testing Pending Legal Challenge

By | March 21, 2012

  • March 22, 2012 at 1:45 pm
    Cheetoh Mulligan says:
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    It is very reasonable for us taxpayers, the ones who ultimately pay the salaries of government employees, to want to hire drug free staff, just as much of the private sector does.
    Further, it is also reasonable for us taxpayers, the ones who ultimately pay the benefits to those on welfare or unemployment, to be helping themselves to become independent and to not be spending our hard earned money on drugs.
    Our great Governor is correct on both issues!

  • March 22, 2012 at 2:36 pm
    Susan says:
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    Our “great Governor”. Please. Rick Scott is a dick.

    • March 22, 2012 at 3:18 pm
      K D Qurick says:
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      Susan, A lot thought went into your comment. Nervous you won’t be able to continue collecting welfare?

  • March 22, 2012 at 4:32 pm
    MP says:
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    If you want to know who Rick Scott is then read this excerpt from his Wikipedia page… in summary: the company he founded and was the current CEO of was found to have bilked state & federal governments for huge sums of money. Rick Scott was “punished” by receiving a $10,000,000 departure settlement along with hundreds of millions of dollars worth of company stock.

    Rick Scott is the antithesis of “good government” trying to be a responsible steward of public funds. Come on- the guy made hundreds of millions of dollars by systematically stealing from state and federal coffers. How on Earth did he win that election?

    FROM WIKI:

    “On March 19, 1997, investigators from the FBI, the Internal Revenue Service and the Department of Health and Human Services served search warrants at Columbia/HCA facilities in El Paso and on dozens of doctors with suspected ties to the company.[21]

    Following the raids, the Columbia/HCA board of directors forced Scott to resign as Chairman and CEO.[22] He was paid $9.88 million in a settlement. He also left owning 10 million shares of stock worth over $350 million.[23][24][25] In 1999, Columbia/HCA changed its name back to HCA, Inc.

    In settlements reached in 2000 and 2002, Columbia/HCA pled guilty to 14 felonies and agreed to a $600+ million fine in the largest fraud settlement in US history. Columbia/HCA admitted systematically overcharging the government by claiming marketing costs as reimbursable, by striking illegal deals with home care agencies, and by filing false data about use of hospital space. They also admitted fraudulently billing Medicare and other health programs by inflating the seriousness of diagnoses and to giving doctors partnerships in company hospitals as a kickback for the doctors referring patients to HCA. They filed false cost reports, fraudulently billing Medicare for home health care workers, and paid kickbacks in the sale of home health agencies and to doctors to refer patients. In addition, they gave doctors “loans” never intending to be repaid, free rent, free office furniture, and free drugs from hospital pharmacies.[5][6][7][8][9]

    In late 2002, HCA agreed to pay the U.S. government $631 million, plus interest, and pay $17.5 million to state Medicaid agencies, in addition to $250 million paid up to that point to resolve outstanding Medicare expense claims.[26] In all, civil law suits cost HCA more than $2 billion to settle, by far the largest fraud settlement in US history.

    • March 22, 2012 at 4:58 pm
      K D Qurick says:
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      Wikipedia is a site that allows anyone to post and is not monitored for correctness. It is a compilation of people just wanting to add definitions and information. It is an impressive site and accomplishment. However, we do not know if MP’s copied post is legit or not.
      Do you have any credible sources, like a newspaper?

      • March 22, 2012 at 9:17 pm
        Jen says:
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        Lol, source patrol, that’s the beauty of wikipedia. Talk that sad, pathetic game somewhere else; we have the tools to look it up (and so do you as you are online, so your neglect to check it yourself is glaringly obvious to the readers whose time you just wasted). From the quoted text, the numbers in brackets, those indicate the source from which the information came. If you scroll down to the endnotes and locate, for example, number 21 (the first bracket occurring in the quoted phrase) wikipedia provides a link to a 1997 New York Times article titled “U.S. Expands Search of Columbia/HCA in Texas.” In the meantime, the accuracy of wikipedia articles must of course be vetted, but linked-to sources encourage that.
        http://partners.nytimes.com/library/financial/032197columbia-hca-investigate.html

  • March 26, 2012 at 11:22 am
    Stephen Tallinghasternathy says:
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    Who is going to pay for these drug tests? And what drug testing service is going to get the windfall of testing every state employees?

    Oh yesh, Rick Scott owns a company that does drug testing:

    “One of the more popular services at Solantic, the urgent care chain co-founded by Florida Gov. Rick Scott, is drug testing, according to Solantic CEO Karen Bowling.

    Given Solantic’s role in that marketplace, critics are again asking whether Scott’s policy initiatives – this time, requiring drug testing of state employees and welfare recipients – are designed to benefit Scott’s bottom line.”

    http://www.palmbeachpost.com/money/gov-rick-scotts-drug-testing-policy-stirs-suspicion-1350922.html

    Rick Scott is a crook.



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