Report: The Southeast’s Storm Surge Risk and Florida’s Hurricane Wake-Up Call

By | July 11, 2017

  • July 11, 2017 at 8:17 am
    David says:
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    This report is foolish. A hurricane is dangerous about 10-20 miles outside the eye. As soon as it hits land, it starts to weaken. Florida is mostly just densely inhabited from the coast inland 10 miles or so. Therefore, other then Miami, a direct hit, would only be extremely dangerous to a few thousand houses at most.
    As far as storm surge? you have Cape Coral on that list… Cape Coral has to sets of barrier islands between it and the Gulf of Mexico… I was there when Charley hit. The storm surge devastated an uninhabited part of one of those barrier islands. Cape Coral received zero storm surge… that is what barrier islands do, the protect from storm surge. Florida is surrounded by barrier islands.

    • July 11, 2017 at 1:27 pm
      Rosenblatt says:
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      Residents who were innudated by water from Sandy would vehimently disagree that the threshold for hurricane damage is only 10-20 miles away from the center.

      • July 11, 2017 at 11:50 pm
        UW says:
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        So would scientists.

        The people making these claims are focusing only on the US. The problems will be worse elsewhere, and largely due to the emissions in the US and other industrialized nations, which is agreed to by almost 100% of climate scientists and supported by almost 100% of all published papers on the topic.

        You can say you only care about the US, but you cannot then also say you are a Christian.

    • July 12, 2017 at 9:37 am
      Kierstin says:
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      You must’ve never been to the east coast of Florida then. To say only a few thousand houses would be impacted if the hurricane hit anywhere but Miami is foolish. Additionally, the Tampa-St Petersburg area is also very densely populated, meaning more than just a few thousand houses would be impacted if a hurricane hit them straight on as well. Also, did you not follow what happened with Hurricane Matthew? Counties on the east coast are still repairing homes, dunes and beaches and we didn’t even get a direct hit! Additionally, not all of Florida is protected with barrier islands. Plus, many of the barrier islands are densely populated themselves or are home to important infrastructure such as Military Installations and the Kennedy Space Center. I was Daytona when Charley came through, even though it had to go through the state to get there it was still a bad storm and caused a lot of damage. Just because you got away relatively Scot-free not everyone did. Eighty percent of the buildings in the southwest county of Charlotte were destroyed and a 2.4 m (8 ft) storm surge occurred in Lee County. One third of all the schools in Charlotte County were demolished, and all 59 schools in Osceola County were damaged. Punta Gorda, which received a direct hit from the eye of the hurricane, was completely leveled. Six schools and 6 fire stations were ruined. In the city of about 16,000 residents, 11,000 homes were destroyed, half of which were mobile homes. There was 15.355 billion dollars worth of damage that was caused by the storm in Florida alone. Next time, try to use facts instead of anecdotes.

  • July 11, 2017 at 2:10 pm
    Jack Kanauph says:
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    To me, storm surge means the rise of the Ocean or Gulf waters due to the hurricane and the damage it would do to homes and roads. I don’t consider the rains associated with a hurricane as storm surge. So this report seems extremely exaggerated to me.

    • July 11, 2017 at 2:16 pm
      Rosenblatt says:
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      I didn’t see “rain” mentioned anywhere in the article – just storm surge and flooding due to rising ocean waters. Where did you see rain being included as part of their analysis?

      • July 11, 2017 at 3:57 pm
        Jack Kanauph says:
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        I did not see Rain in the article, which is why I said the report seems extremely exaggerated to me.

        • July 11, 2017 at 4:48 pm
          Rosenblatt says:
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          Sorry I misunderstood you, Jack. I thought you were saying the report seemed exaggerated because they included rain in their analysis and it wasn’t just based on storm surge. My bad.

        • July 11, 2017 at 11:53 pm
          UW says:
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          Hurricanes do not have rain? I also didn’t see gravity mentioned, therefore I don’t see any reason to assume these storms would even stay on earth, and wouldn’t just float into space. FAKE NEWS! MAGA!

    • July 11, 2017 at 2:43 pm
      Agent says:
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      Jack, the Climate Change Hoaxers are at it again. Anything to create fear in the population and blame every storm on man. Perhaps they should move to Venezuela and check that country out.

      • July 11, 2017 at 3:09 pm
        Rosenblatt says:
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        This article had NOTHING to do with climate change, global warming, assigning blame for storms, etc. Unless your intent was to divert from discussing the actual topic, I don’t know why you brought that up.

        • July 16, 2017 at 1:42 am
          Doug Fisher says:
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          That was very obviously his only intent. Ignore data, ignore science, push all-in on rhetoric and ignorance.



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