Reuters Special Report: U.S. Banks Book Trades Abroad to Bypass U.S. Regulation

By Charles Levinson | August 24, 2015

  • August 24, 2015 at 1:42 pm
    Jack says:
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    I’m beginning to think all the executives from these places that graduated from all these liberal ivy league schools should have read the Bible while they were there? Opps…nevermind.

    • August 24, 2015 at 2:18 pm
      Agent says:
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      So Jack, why would banks go around Dodd-Frank to do all this offshore trading? We all know how “fair” this Administration is, don’t we?

      • August 24, 2015 at 2:30 pm
        FFA says:
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        Its the Illinois Way….

        • August 24, 2015 at 2:41 pm
          Agent says:
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          Hi FFA, I heard on the radio that Jay Ratliff has been suspended for 3 games for violating the substance abuse policy of the NFL. He got off lighter than Brady for Deflategate. What is wrong with this picture?

          • August 27, 2015 at 5:32 pm
            Yogi Polar Berra says:
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            Apparently, as far as Goodell is concerned, air is a more highly controlled substance than cannabis, PEDs, alcohol, and other pharmapsychedelicals. To answer your question, some of the NFL powers-that-be may look unkindly to the past success of the Patriots. Where have we seen that before?

  • August 24, 2015 at 4:47 pm
    Elizabeth Malone says:
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    We no longer have a financial system; we have an international criminal conspiricy. These are the banks that fixed the LIBOR:
    “Many of the CFTC employees who were lobbied in these meetings went on to work for banks. Between 2010 and 2013, there were 50 CFTC staffers who met with the top five U.S. banks 10 or more times. Of those 50 staffers, at least 25 now work for the big five or other top swaps-dealing banks, or for law firms and lobbyists representing these banks.

    The lobbying blitz helped win a ruling from the CFTC that left U.S. banks’ overseas operations largely outside the jurisdiction of U.S. regulators. After that rule passed, U.S. banks simply shipped more trades overseas. By December of 2014, certain U.S. swaps markets had seen 95 percent of their trading volume disappear in less than two years.”

    • August 24, 2015 at 5:22 pm
      Agent says:
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      Some of those Goldman Sachs guys went to work for the Obama Administration after the last sub prime meltdown. Does that give you some re-assurance?

      • August 24, 2015 at 7:09 pm
        Elizabeth Malone says:
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        Psychopathy (/saɪˈkɒpəθi/), also known as—though sometimes distinguished from—sociopathy (/soʊsiˈɒpəθi/), is traditionally defined as a personality disorder characterized by enduring antisocial behavior, diminished empathy and remorse, and disinhibited or bold behavior, aka banker or financier.

        • August 25, 2015 at 9:50 am
          Agent says:
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          Elizabeth, the traits you have listed are common to Progressive Socialists who don’t know right from wrong, are ok with killing babies and selling the body parts.

  • August 25, 2015 at 3:52 pm
    Wally says:
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    If, like me, you don’t want to subject yourself to these risks, don’t buy their stock and don’t give them your money. Do business with your local bank- not one of these monsters.

  • August 27, 2015 at 5:38 pm
    Yogi Polar Berra says:
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    People from foreign countries come to the US for the opportunities for enrichment and freedom from political oppression.

    Companies in the US leave for foreign lands for the opportunity to retain most of their profits, and for freedom from regulatory oppression.

    Ironic, isn’t it?

    • August 28, 2015 at 4:23 pm
      Agent says:
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      Some of our smarter politicians have suggested that we give companies tax breaks to bring their money back to the US and actually create jobs here again. That seems to have been falling on deaf ears.



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