How to Get Teens to Take Dangers of Distracted Driving Seriously

November 29, 2016

  • November 29, 2016 at 1:54 pm
    Questionning says:
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    First you have to get the parents to put their phone away while driving. Kids learn by example. Just like teaching kids to wear seat belts. It needs to be an automatic reaction upon entering the car. Belt up. Put the phone away where you can’t reach it. Designate a Non Drinking Driver. Set the example and they will follow.

  • November 29, 2016 at 2:05 pm
    Jack Kanauph says:
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    This is a nice attempt, but it is like a Zig Ziglar speech. It gets you all pumped up for about a week or so, then you go back to your old ways.
    If they could add a segment where the kids get behind the wheel of a simulated drive, have them answer texts while driving. and have realistic, bloody accidents occur because of the distraction, that may have a longer effect. It takes 30 days of repetition to make a habit.

    • November 29, 2016 at 2:11 pm
      Agent says:
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      Good one Jack. It extends from teenagers to Millennials to Gen X, Gen Y who have all grown up in the cell era. It is a very addictive instrument and most have to have their eyes and ears trained on it every waking moment. Jordan Spieth, the famous young PGA golfer made a commercial last year about his cell and Social Media. Showed him getting in his car, turning the cell off and putting it in the glove box. Smart young man I might add.

      • November 30, 2016 at 9:20 am
        Captain Planet says:
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        Agent,
        It extends to anyone with a cell phone who doesn’t have respect for other drivers, bikers, or pedestrians around them. I see people of all ages using the phone when they are driving. Yes, I have even caught the elderly. I wouldn’t point the finger at just a certain demographic. I agree, it can be addictive. I think it needs to be treated as drunk driving. And yes, the more means of intervention, the better.

        Speith is a great golfer to watch and his commercial was good.

  • November 29, 2016 at 4:21 pm
    Vijay Dixit says:
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    We should not forget that distracted driving is a multi-headed monster lurking inside a driver’s head and ready to attack without warning. Therefore, we must not rely on one intervention. The trauma center visit mentioned in the Journal of Trauma Nursing as well as Jordan Speith’s commercial both can be effective. Drawing from Jack’s comment, I feel that different interventions reinforced on regular intervals are needed to make a lasting impact.

    I have implemented such a model at three Minnesota high schools through a foundation (www.shreyadixit.org) that I chair in memory of my daughter who was killed by a distracted driver nine years ago. I also offer solutions in my 2016 book:ONE SPLIT SECOND on this epidemic.

    • November 30, 2016 at 9:25 am
      Jack Kanauph says:
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      Vijay,
      Sorry for your loss. I admire how you have handled it by starting a foundation to help others and to help prevent future occurrences.

    • November 30, 2016 at 10:06 am
      Agent says:
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      Vijay, good for you. Sorry for your loss. I am an insurance agent who has seen several tragedies happen from addictive use of cells. One story recently on this site had a guy trying to play Pokémon Go while driving. That didn’t end well.

    • November 30, 2016 at 10:07 am
      perplexed says:
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      Vijay, So sorry for your loss. I visited your website and am sending links to all my friends and family. Thank you for your efforts to heighten awareness of the problem of distracted driving. I worry about my grandkids walking to school and riding bikes these days. So many people, young and old are driving with their phones in hand. It’s not just younger people. It’s people my age and my 39-45 year old kids. Sad.

      • December 1, 2016 at 3:43 pm
        Agent says:
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        Perplexed, I have seen videos of drivers cruising past school buses while it is unloading. Invariably, they were on their cell and had no clue what they were doing.

  • December 4, 2016 at 11:15 am
    Mark Fowler says:
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    Consuming alcoholic beverages is restricted to age limitation accessibility. Most States in the USA require minimum age of 18yrs old to possess and/or consume Alcoholic beverages legally. In our modern society regarding cell phone possession … there’s not an age restriction. In our adolescence most do not realize the danger of having a cell phone in hand 24/7. Driving while impaired DUI or distracted driving are both very dangerous and risky. The USA population of persons under 18yrs of age is approximately 20%. Our children are learning about and using cell phone technology to listen to music, play games, talk and text while walking which potentially leads to them doing the same while driving. People are more than 23 times more likely to be involved in a collision while driving if they’re texting and driving. Stop the texts-Stop the wrecks is something that Arizona Alliance Traffic Survival School in Arizona promotes at every ADOT MVD TSS class we teach. In our opinion texting and driving is equally dangerous but more common among persons who are driving. This is why we believe there is such a large increase in the statistics of the number of crashes involving distracted driving. Please don’t do either while driving; someone’s life is more important than that.



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