National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health News

Coal Industry Tax Cut Threatens Miners’ Benefits Fund as Black Lung Cases Surge

As a young man, Barry Shrewsbury dug coal in the West Virginia mines and spent his time off hunting and fishing in the rolling hills. Now, at 62, he struggles to breathe and accomplish basic tasks such as shopping and …

Study: Black Lung Cases Among Appalachian Coal Miners On the Rise

A new research letter published in a medical journal details hundreds of cases of black lung disease in the Central Appalachian coalfields. Three clinics in southwestern Virginia identified 416 coal miners with the disease from January 2013 to February 2017, …

How to Protect Older Workers from Injuries on the Job

When managers at Bon Secours Virginia Health System started analyzing worker’s compensation cases, they noticed a bad combination: Lifting heavy and sicker patients was taking a toll on older nurses. “We saw an increase in back injuries and older workers …

Record Number of Miners Being Diagnosed with Black Lung Disease

New data show many more coal miners across Appalachia suffering from the most serious form of black lung disease than federal regulators previously reported. National Public Radio reported Friday that its investigation shows cases 10 times more prevalent, with data …

Report: Eastern Kentucky Sees Spike in Severe Black-Lung Cases

A spike in serious black-lung cases in eastern Kentucky indicates that a disease lawmakers hoped to eradicate decades ago continues to afflict miners. Citing a National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health report released Dec. 15, the Lexington Herald-Leader says …

University of Kentucky to Study Workplace Safety in Appalachia

A center at the University of Kentucky is receiving a five-year, $5 million grant to improve occupational health and safety in central Appalachia and Kentucky. UK said the region reports higher rates of occupational injuries and fatalities than the rest …

Safety Agency to Probe Fracking Risks After Deaths of 4 Workers

The Obama administration is investigating the health risks of hydraulic fracturing after at least four deaths among oilfield workers since 2010 in North Dakota and Montana. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health said the workers were exposed to …

9/11 Responders Far From NYC Seek Compensation

They weren’t exposed to anywhere near the same level of ash, grit and fumes, but emergency workers who rushed to the Pentagon and the Pennsylvania countryside on 9/11 are signing up for the same compensation and health benefits being given …

Workplace Injuries Less Likely Where Employers Provide Paid Sick Leave

Workers with access to paid sick leave are 28 percent less likely overall to suffer nonfatal occupational injuries than workers without access to paid sick leave, according to a National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) study. The study …

Black Lung Protections for Miners Failing; Cases Continue to Rise

Black lung diagnoses have doubled in the last decade, and a new investigation blames a combination of factors, including operators who cheat the system and lax enforcement by regulators. Experts have warned of the resurgence since 1995, but an investigation …